Red Gum Woodlands: Ecological Asset 8

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Description

Red Gum woodlands are low lying freshwater dependant woodlands that provide critical hollow and nesting refuges for a high density of insectivorous bird communities. Red gums are often indicators of high quality freshwater distribution in the landscape.

The River Red Gum woodland (Eucalyptus camaldulensis) is a regionally threatened plant community, some of which is protected in Bascombe Well and Shannon Conservation Parks. The River Red Gum is restricted to environments where the soil is moist to a considerable depth, indicating a dependence on the hydrology and groundwater basins beneath the parks.

Less than 25% of remaining woodlands are represented in the reserve system, further highlighting the importance of protecting these woodlands on private land.

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Threatened or Important Species

Woodland Birds dependant on nesting Hollows
Short Beaked Echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus)
Greater Long-eared Bat (Nyctophilus timoriensis)
Frog species during periods of flooding

Threats to Red Gum Woodlands

      • Historical land clearance
      • Stock rabbit and kangaroo grazing
      • Ground water extraction
      • Altered fire regime
      • Age classes remaining in landscape – only old trees have hollows and provide improved habitat for some fauna species

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